• Why We Want You to Be Rich: Two Men, One Message

    Rich Dad, Poor Dad author and motivational speaker Robert T. Kiyosaki and celebrity rich man Donald J. Trump join forces to come to the aid of America’s shrinking middle class. These thriving multimillionaires give advice designed to help average readers expand their wealth in the harsh economy. Firm steps towards financial literacy.

    From book cover:

    The world is facing many challenges and one of them is financial. The entitlement mentality is epidemic, creating people who expect their countries, employers, or families to take care of them. Donald Trump and Robert Kiyosaki, both successful businessmen, are natural teachers and have joined forces to address these challenges. They believe you cannot solve money problems with money. You can only solve money problems with financial education. Trump and Kiyosaki want to teach you to be rich.

    “Give a man a fish, and you feed him for a day.

    Teach him to fish, and you feed him for a lifetime.”

    They each could have written a book on the subject, but they chose instead to write a book together because of their shared passion for education and their desire to bring emphasis to the importance of financial education. In addition they have designated a portion of the profits from each book to be donated to charitable and educational organizations that also support financial education.

     599.00 1,250.00
  • Exporting America: Why Corporate Greed Is Shipping American Jobs Overseas

    The renowned business journalist and CNN anchor takes aim at the corporate executives and Washington politicians who profit by exporting U.S. jobs overseas–and shows readers what they can do to save not only their own careers, but the American way of life.

     199.00 399.00
  • The Peter Principle : Why Things Always Go Wrong

    The Peter Principle has cosmic implications.”

    New York Times

    Back in 1969, Lawrence J. Peter created a cultural phenomenon  with his brilliant, outrageous, hilarious, and all-too-true treatise on business and life, The Peter Principle—and his words and theories are as true today as they were then. By posing—and answering—the eternal question, “Why do things always go wrong?” Peter explores the incompetence that runs so rampant through our society, our workplace, and our world in an outrageously funny yet honest and eye-opening manner. With a new foreword by Robert I. Sutton, bestselling author of The No Asshole Rule, this twenty-first century edition of Peter’s classic is set to shake up the business world all over again.

     170.00 350.00
  • Think Like a Freak

    The New York Times bestselling Freakonomics changed the way we see the world, exposing the hidden side of just about everything. Then came SuperFreakonomics, a documentary film, an award-winning podcast, and more.

    Now, with Think Like a Freak, Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner have written their most revolutionary book yet. With their trademark blend of captivating storytelling and unconventional analysis, they take us inside their thought process and teach us all to think a bit more productively, more creatively, more rationally—to think, that is, like a Freak.

    Levitt and Dubner offer a blueprint for an entirely new way to solve problems, whether your interest lies in minor lifehacks or major global reforms. As always, no topic is off-limits. They range from business to philanthropy to sports to politics, all with the goal of retraining your brain. Along the way, you’ll learn the secrets of a Japanese hot-dog-eating champion, the reason an Australian doctor swallowed a batch of dangerous bacteria, and why Nigerian e-mail scammers make a point of saying they’re from Nigeria.

    Some of the steps toward thinking like a Freak:

    First, put away your moral compass—because it’s hard to see a problem clearly if you’ve already decided what to do about it.

    Learn to say “I don’t know”—for until you can admit what you don’t yet know, it’s virtually impossible to learn what you need to.

    Think like a child—because you’ll come up with better ideas and ask better questions.

    Take a master class in incentives—because for better or worse, incentives rule our world.

    Learn to persuade people who don’t want to be persuaded—because being right is rarely enough to carry the day.

    Learn to appreciate the upside of quitting—because you can’t solve tomorrow’s problem if you aren’t willing to abandon today’s dud.

    Levitt and Dubner plainly see the world like no one else. Now you can too. Never before have such iconoclastic thinkers been so revealing—and so much fun to read.

     250.00 499.00

    Think Like a Freak

     250.00 499.00
  • Rich Dad’s Guide to Investing: What the Rich Invest in, That the Poor and Middle Class Do Not!

    Personal finance author and lecturer Robert T. Kiyosaki developed his unique economic perspective from two very different influences – two fathers. One father (Robert’s real father) was a highly educated man but fiscally poor. The other was the father of Robert’s best friend – that dad was a college drop-out who became a self-made multi-millionaire. In this follow-up to the bestselling Rich Dad, Poor Dad, he reveals the secret of how the wealthiest people become wealthier by presenting some simple investing secrets and explaining how anyone can enjoy cash benefits merely by knowing where and how best to invest their money.

     249.00 399.00
  • The Google Story

    If Google’s splashy IPO and skyrocketing stock haven’t revived the dotcom sector, they have certainly revived the dotcom hype industry, judging by this adulatory history of the Internet search engine. Billionaire founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin, their counter-cultural rectitude imbibed straight from the Burning Man festival, are brilliant visionaries dedicated to putting all information at mankind’s fingertips and “genuinely nice people” who “didn’t care about getting rich.” Their company motto, “Don’t Be Evil,” is not just PR boilerplate rendered in fantasy-gaming rhetoric, but a deeply-pondered organizing principle. Washington Post reporter Vise, author of The Bureau and the Mole, and researcher Malseed give a serviceable rundown of the company’s rise from grad-student project to web juggernaut, its innovative technology and targeted advertising system, its savvy deal-making and its inevitable battles with Microsoft. But while they raise the occasional quibble about controversial company policies, they generally allow Google’s image of idealism to overshadow the reality of a corporate leviathan. Worse, the bloated text feels like the product of an overly broad web search: anything with keyword Google-executives’ speeches, seminar talks, informal Q and A sessions with students, company press releases, legal documents, SEC filings, even the company chef’s fried chicken recipe-comes up, excerpted at inordinate and rambling length, drowning insight in a flood of information. (Publishers Weekly)

     195.00 295.00

    The Google Story

     195.00 295.00
  • Why We Want You to Be Rich: Two Men, One Message

    Rich Dad, Poor Dad author and motivational speaker Robert T. Kiyosaki and celebrity rich man Donald J. Trump join forces to come to the aid of America’s shrinking middle class. These thriving multimillionaires give advice designed to help average readers expand their wealth in the harsh economy. Firm steps towards financial literacy.

    From book cover:

    The world is facing many challenges and one of them is financial. The entitlement mentality is epidemic, creating people who expect their countries, employers, or families to take care of them. Donald Trump and Robert Kiyosaki, both successful businessmen, are natural teachers and have joined forces to address these challenges. They believe you cannot solve money problems with money. You can only solve money problems with financial education. Trump and Kiyosaki want to teach you to be rich.

    “Give a man a fish, and you feed him for a day.

    Teach him to fish, and you feed him for a lifetime.”

    They each could have written a book on the subject, but they chose instead to write a book together because of their shared passion for education and their desire to bring emphasis to the importance of financial education. In addition they have designated a portion of the profits from each book to be donated to charitable and educational organizations that also support financial education.

     599.00 1,250.00
  • Exporting America: Why Corporate Greed Is Shipping American Jobs Overseas

    The renowned business journalist and CNN anchor takes aim at the corporate executives and Washington politicians who profit by exporting U.S. jobs overseas–and shows readers what they can do to save not only their own careers, but the American way of life.

     199.00 399.00
  • The Peter Principle : Why Things Always Go Wrong

    The Peter Principle has cosmic implications.”

    New York Times

    Back in 1969, Lawrence J. Peter created a cultural phenomenon  with his brilliant, outrageous, hilarious, and all-too-true treatise on business and life, The Peter Principle—and his words and theories are as true today as they were then. By posing—and answering—the eternal question, “Why do things always go wrong?” Peter explores the incompetence that runs so rampant through our society, our workplace, and our world in an outrageously funny yet honest and eye-opening manner. With a new foreword by Robert I. Sutton, bestselling author of The No Asshole Rule, this twenty-first century edition of Peter’s classic is set to shake up the business world all over again.

     170.00 350.00
  • Rich Dad’s Guide to Investing: What the Rich Invest in, That the Poor and Middle Class Do Not!

    Personal finance author and lecturer Robert T. Kiyosaki developed his unique economic perspective from two very different influences – two fathers. One father (Robert’s real father) was a highly educated man but fiscally poor. The other was the father of Robert’s best friend – that dad was a college drop-out who became a self-made multi-millionaire. In this follow-up to the bestselling Rich Dad, Poor Dad, he reveals the secret of how the wealthiest people become wealthier by presenting some simple investing secrets and explaining how anyone can enjoy cash benefits merely by knowing where and how best to invest their money.

     249.00 399.00
  • The Google Story

    If Google’s splashy IPO and skyrocketing stock haven’t revived the dotcom sector, they have certainly revived the dotcom hype industry, judging by this adulatory history of the Internet search engine. Billionaire founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin, their counter-cultural rectitude imbibed straight from the Burning Man festival, are brilliant visionaries dedicated to putting all information at mankind’s fingertips and “genuinely nice people” who “didn’t care about getting rich.” Their company motto, “Don’t Be Evil,” is not just PR boilerplate rendered in fantasy-gaming rhetoric, but a deeply-pondered organizing principle. Washington Post reporter Vise, author of The Bureau and the Mole, and researcher Malseed give a serviceable rundown of the company’s rise from grad-student project to web juggernaut, its innovative technology and targeted advertising system, its savvy deal-making and its inevitable battles with Microsoft. But while they raise the occasional quibble about controversial company policies, they generally allow Google’s image of idealism to overshadow the reality of a corporate leviathan. Worse, the bloated text feels like the product of an overly broad web search: anything with keyword Google-executives’ speeches, seminar talks, informal Q and A sessions with students, company press releases, legal documents, SEC filings, even the company chef’s fried chicken recipe-comes up, excerpted at inordinate and rambling length, drowning insight in a flood of information. (Publishers Weekly)

     195.00 295.00

    The Google Story

     195.00 295.00

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